Get a Sneak Peak at Our Big Redesign and Give Your Feedback

One of the reasons I haven’t been posting here much lately is that I’ve been working with the staff at the Open Planning Project on a pretty substantial redesign for Streetsblog, Streetfilms and the New York City Streets Renaissance web sites.

In addition to giving our sites a new look and feel, we are bringing them together as the Livable Streets Network and adding an array of new tools and functionality. At LivableStreets.com, you will find Streetswiki, an altogether new site where (with your help) we aim to build a comprehensive, community-created, online encyclopedia of sustainable transportation policies, practices and ideas from
around the world. Also at LSN, you will be able to create your own profile and permanent identity (think Facebook for progressive urban planning geeks). And you’ll find online group management tools designed to help you organize and manage bottom-up Livable Streets projects in your own community and connect with like-minded activists working to re-envision and transform their neighborhoods and cities.

The new sites are a little rough around the edges and there is still a lot of work to do, but we really want to give you a sneak peak and, most important, receive some of your feedback as well. If you’re interested in taking a look, take a few seconds to fill out this form and we’ll get back to you via e-mail with a link to the new site.

  • This is very minor and picky – which just shows that I don’t have any larger complaints or concerns about the redesign.

    I prefer the spelling “liveable,” and according to the OED I have Jane Austen and J.G. Lockhart on my side. If you prefer “livable” (apparently following Donald Appleyard), go ahead and use it, but you might want to register “liveablestreets.org”.

  • Angus Grieve-Smith

    Or maybe it’s all a movement for streets where Liv Tyler can feel comfortable riding in the road, not on the sidewalk?

    http://socialitelife.celebuzz.com/2005/09/16/liv_tyler_goes_biking.php

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