Infinite Jest

Here’s a little back-to-school fun:

With the help of an underground tunnel this group of 94 high school seniors from who-knows-where created a never-ending line of pedestrians crossing the street, not allowing a single car to pass for a full 15 minutes. Granted, it’s a bit man power-intensive but wow, is this ever an effective traffic-calming technique. At one point in the video above, a thrilled particpant says, "We are going to get in so much trouble for this!"

In addition to being a fine prank, this is pretty much exactly the same tactic that Transportation Alternatives and Downtown community members used in 1996 to launch what ultimately became the Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming Project. As an act of civil disobedience, a line of marchers ground traffic to a halt by walking in a continuous circle, filling all four crosswalks at a busy intersection during morning rush hour.

Via CollegeHumor.com

  • Hilary Kitasei

    A+

  • da

    brilliant…

    and hey, kids, you don’t even need a tunnel for this. just walk into one building, turn around, and go back across the street again in the other direction.

  • mfs

    If this were in NYC, it would only be a matter of minutes before you had a yellow cab or SUV plowing through the peds.

  • Spud Spudly

    If it was NYC it would only be a matter of minutes before NYPD swooped in a scooped up the whole lot of them.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Brooklyn Pedestrian Safety Forum

|
Community Education Council District 15 and Brooklyn Community Board 7 will hold a Pedestrian Safety Forum for the Third and Fourth Avenue corridor. A particular concern for the CEC is the 10 District 15 schools that are located along Third and Fourth Avenues, plus several other public schools and a number of private and parochial […]

Legacy of Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming Advocates Continues

|
A bit more background on the generous neckdown at Smith and Bergen spotlighted earlier today: This pedestrian amenity never would have been built without the long-term organizing for the Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming Project. Street protests and advocacy campaigns stretching back more than a dozen years are bearing fruit now. And advocates are still on […]

Sneckdowns: The Early Years

|
Before there were hashtags and #sneckdowns, there was Michael King, taking pictures of residual snow on NYC street corners. A principal with Nelson\Nygaard, King is an architect by training and a pioneer of traffic calming street design in the United States. He captured these images to show how much asphalt can easily be claimed to […]

Plan Urged Safety Measures for Intersection Where Boy Died

|
The May 2003 final report of the Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming Project recommended pedestrian safety measures designed specifically to prevent the kind of collision that killed a four-year-old boy in the Gowanus section of Brooklyn on Tuesday afternoon.  A graphic from the Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming Project final plan showing pedestrian safety recommendations for Third […]

DOT Pledged Ped Safety Fixes by 2006 on Deadly Third Ave

|
New York City’s Department of Transportation failed to follow through on a 2004 pledge to build potentially life-saving pedestrian safety improvements along the Third Avenue corridor where a 4-year-old boy was run over and killed last Tuesday. DOT’s announcement of $4 million in funding for the installation of "median extensions, neckdowns and other traffic-calming" measures […]

Traffic Engineering by Body Count

|
Van Brunt and Wolcott Streets. Before paint, July 7. After paint, July 14. The New York Observer’s Real Estate reported that the woman struck by a mini-van pulling out of the Fairway Market parking lot in Red Hook on Thursday, July 6, has died. The Daily News identified her as Janett Ramos, 45, of Sunset […]