Congestion Pricing News of the World

We can barely keep up with the international congestion pricing headlines these days:

  • Mumbai, India to Charge Fees for Driving (Mumbai Newsline)
  • Finland: Half of Helsinki Backs Congestion Charge (Newsroom Finland)
  • New Zealand: Pricing Could Ease Traffic Jams, New Study Suggests (Scoop)
  • Singapore: LTA to Expand Electronic Road Pricing (Channel NewsAsia)
  • Charleston E-ZPass Bill Sets the Table for a Toll Hike (Register – Herald)
  • Innovation Needed, Congestion Pricing, Not More Roads, an Answer (SF Chron)
  • Mary Peters: Forget Gas Taxes, Charge for Road Use Instead (Washington Post)
  • Value Pricing Project Quarterly Report (Transportation Research Board)
  • Strategies for Making Existing Road Infrastructure Perform Better (GAO)
  • Principles of Efficient Congestion Pricing by William Vickrey (Columbia U., 1992)

Thanks to Roger Herz.

  • Dan Icolari

    Re the Mary Peters article: Why not congestion pricing AND a gas tax?

  • Dave

    “You’re not reducing traffic flow, you’re increasing it, because traffic is spread more evenly over time,” he has said. “Even some proponents of congestion pricing don’t understand that.”

    Interesting point. Although the scheme described in this article (the summary of William Vickrey’s ideas on congestion pricing) is slightly different from that currently under consideration for New York, should there still be a worry that congestion pricing will result in more cars travelling at higher speeds (to the disadvantage of other modes, notably bicycling)?

  • From Peters’ article: “it would be virtual policy schizophrenia to increase our reliance on gasoline tax revenue to improve and sustain our nation’s transportation systems while striving to reduce U.S. oil consumption and promote the production and use of alternative fuels.”

    On the contrary, it is policy schizophrenia to claim you want to reduce oil consumption and to refuse to increase the gas tax.

  • Charles Whitley

    According to this article, Mumbai is going to study congestion pricing, not put it in place. Change your misleading headline.

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