Congestion Pricing Returns to Stockholm

congestion_charging2.jpg 

Sweden re-launched its congestion pricing system today following a 6-month trial and voter referendum last September,
in which Stockholm residents approved the traffic control measure by a margin of 52 to 45. The referendum was a definitive victory for a system that reduced Stockholm’s traffic congestion by as much as 50 percent and decreased noxious air pollution by 14 percent (you can see some stats here). Notably, prior to the 6-month trial run, polls showed that as many as 80 percent of Stockholm residents were against the idea congestion pricing.

The Local reports on the newly relaunched pricing system:

There will be a number of key differences between the new arrangements
and those during last year’s trial. One change is that the transponders
– electronic devices used in the trial to make it possible to take the
charge directly out of drivers’ accounts – will not be used. Instead,
cameras will read cars’ plates, and those vehicles whose drivers are
registered will have the money debited directly from their accounts.

Other drivers, as before, will have to pay the charge within 14 days of
driving in the zone. This can be done online, at Pressbyrån or 7-Eleven
stores or in banks.

Another key difference is that taxis will no longer be exempted from
paying the charge. A number of taxi operators have already said they
plan to increase charges as a result. The charge will be tax-deductable
for some companies and commuters.

Mike Castleman, a New Yorker currently in Stockholm offers some congestion pricing photographs on Flickr. Below is a photo of the pricing menu, which charges different fees based on time-of-day. "Kr" stands for Kronor, the Swedish currency.


  • ed

    That’s pretty cheap! At 7 SEK = 1 USD, that means the prices range from ~$1.50 to ~$3. I’m surprised that they get such big results with such a low charge (esp. compared to London).

  • Al Smith

    What happened to the daily “Today’s Headlines”?? None yesterday, seemingly none today. I rely on that stuff, man! 🙂

  • Sorry, Al. 6-month-old is having some sleep issues and it’s wreaking havoc at Sblog HQ.

  • Josh

    They have 7-Eleven in Sweden? Who knew?

  • Erik

    BTW the Stockholm system charges on BOTH entry and exit from the central city. There is a range for peak and offpeak times and a daily cap of (I think) 60kr.

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