Sadik-Khan: Many Initiatives Are Under Way…

Today’s Crain’s Insider, available to subscribers only, reports on the next steps for the Bloomberg Administration’s broader Long-Term Sustainability Plan now that congestion pricing has cleared its first hurdle in Albany:

7.30.07 Crain’s NY Business

The Insider

by Erik Engquist and Anne Michaud

GREEN PLAN Closer to home

NOW THAT the Legislature has passed a congestion-pricing bill, the Bloomberg administration can turn to other environmental initiatives it outlined this spring in PlaNYC 2030, its blueprint for the city’s future.

"A lot of effort has been put into what’s happening in Albany," says Jason Babbie, senior environmental policy analyst at the New York Public Interest Research Group. "Now, it’s going to take some work putting these other things in motion. But it’s not rocket science."

The city can get 88% of the way toward its goal of cutting annual greenhouse gas emissions by 49.1 million metric tons from projected 2030 levels by adding clean power generation capacity, making buildings more efficient and accommodating 900,000 residents who would otherwise live in sprawling suburbs.

Furthermore, much of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s green agenda will be hammered out by the Public Service Commission, says Ashok Gupta of the Natural Resources Defense Council. "That’s where the big decisions will be made that will be critical to the city’s efforts, through the regulatory process and not the legislative process."

Meanwhile, the city’s transportation commissioner says her agency is pressing forward with traffic-cutting plans that don’t require approval from Albany or Washington. Janette Sadik-Khan says that many initiatives are under way and more are under consideration, including perhaps new alternate-side parking regulations. She aims for citywide installation of advanced signal controllers-now used on only a third of the city’s traffic corridors.

To reduce the number of drivers cruising for parking spots, Ms. Sadik-Khan says, the city will put muni meters on more commercial strips, and it may raise prices. A crackdown on placard abuse is getting closer, she says.

  • gecko

    Way to go!

  • Good things are happening. A crackdown on placard abuse is long overdue, and is an urgent priority.

    Placard abuse erodes respect for the rule of law and government integrity.

  • d

    Any progress on closing Central Park and Prospect Park to traffic? Of all the plans, it seems like one of the easiest things they could do.

  • nobody

    A placard abuse crackdown would be wonderful, but overnight results could be obtained if the Commissioner issued a directive to officers to actually obey the law, followed up with ticketing and towing. Thus far, besides in Chinatown, there has been zero leadership from anywhere in the PD on this issue. How much can the DoT really do?

  • MD

    I agree with d. How can a mayor bold enough to propose charging motorists to drive into Manhattan be too timid to tell people they can’t drive in parks? It’s not like there isn’t a constituency for such a plan – the supporters are numerous and passionate. Can anyone explain this one to us?

  • greg

    how about mandating that all city emplyees take public transportation.

    and yes, close the damn parks to auto traffic!!!

  • “NOW THAT the Legislature has passed a congestion-pricing bill”

    hehe, good one.

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