A Rising Bicycle Tide in Mexico City

ebrard.jpgBack in April, Marcelo Ebrad, the mayor of Mexico City, announced he wanted those who worked in his administration to ride bicycles to work one day a month (at right, Ebrard, center, kicks off the program). Many were shocked at the idea, or simply laughed it off. But this excellent article in the San Diego Union details how the mayor’s decree to his employees has meshed with several other initiatives to raise the profile of bicycling as a legitimate form of transportation in the traffic-clogged city:

Four months later, the officials have warmed up to the idea of riding bicycles to work, especially after 47-year-old Ebrard – who smokes and is not fond of exercise — warned them their jobs depended on their participation.

No one expects their efforts to bring a flood of bicycles into Mexico City’s crowded streets. But the ambitious program has sparked a national discussion about the auto congestion and pollution that are choking the capital city.

Since the program began, tens of thousands of Mexico City residents have taken to the streets on Sundays, when Ebrard’s government has closed the downtown thoroughfares to vehicular traffic.

Men and women, young and old, fill the wide avenues with everything from vintage bikes to skates and scooters.

"Magnífico!" enthused Juan Carlos Espinosa, a 30-year-old computer programmer, as he used in-line skates to glide down elegant Reforma boulevard. "This is what we need to motivate us to exercise."

The government plans to build 186 miles of bike lanes and install bike racks at Metro stations and outside hundreds of city buildings. Mexico City even started a loan program so people who don’t own bikes won’t be left out.

The plan has gained the support of the World Bank, which is giving Mexico City a $100,000 grant to design a master plan to make the city bicycle-friendly.

"Many people have looked at Mexico City’s traffic problems and thrown their hands in the air. This mayor is not doing that," said Michael Replogle, president of the New York-based Institute for Transportation Policy, who was in Mexico City last week to work with city officials on the bicycle project.

Photo: Associated Press

  • jim

    thanks for spreading the word. when i moved to mexico city from chicago seven months ago, i thought i’d kissed urban riding goodbye. not the case. i feel safer riding here than i ever did in chicago/portland/denver. sure, the drivers are insane, but the rules of the road play into the bicyclists’ hands: don’t hit anything, don’t get hit. here i’m seen. i love it.

  • Dan

    Jim,
    I am planning on visiting Mexico City and would like to rent a bicycle, to ride in the downtown area on a Sunday (following the spirit of the article). Any suggestions on bike rental places?
    Thank you.
    Dan J.

  • Sara

    I am a grad student at the University of Michigan studying Landscape architecture and Urban planning. I am very interested in non-moto and mass transit, and would like to gain international experience.

    I am pursuing a masters project and need project ideas/suggestions/ leads/ and contacts.

    Please email any suggestions. Thanks!

  • The former mayor of Bogota, Enrique Penalosa, made some pretty radical changes in his city to reduce car use and promote biking, walking and public transit, including a far-reaching bus transit system. I read about him on PPS, the Project for Public Spaces: http://www.pps.org/info/placemakingtools/placemakers/epenalosa

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Mexico City 2030?

|
As New York City government employees rabidly defend the carte blanche parking privileges that enable their daily driving habit, the mayor of Mexico City has decreed that officials there bike or take transit to work once a month. According to the BBC, less than one percent of trips in Mexico City are taken by bike, […]

With a Boost From Bike-Share, Cycling Surges on Mexico City’s Mean Streets

|
This is the third in a series of reports about sustainable transportation policies in Mexico City. Last week, Streetsblog participated in a tour of the city led by the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation. Previous installments covered pedestrian improvements and the city’s new bus rapid transit system. Mexico City never […]

How Mexico City Fought and Cajoled to Reclaim Streets for Pedestrians

|
This is the first in a series of reports about sustainable transportation policies in Mexico City. Last week, Streetsblog participated in a tour of the city led by the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation. Upcoming installments will cover the city’s transit expansions, particularly its new bus rapid transit […]

Ex-DOT Bike Director Speaks

|
In today’s New York Sun Bradley Hope scoops up the first follow-up interview with former DOT Bicycle Program Director Andrew Vesselenovitch after his controversial resignation letter. Vesselenovitch has a big story to tell and I have a feeling that this isn’t the last we’ve heard of it: Mr. Vesselinovitch relinquished his job as director of the bicycle program at the Department […]

NYC DOT Seeking 10,000-Bike System From Bike-Share Providers

|
New York City’s plans to implement a public bicycle system should accelerate rapidly with the official release today of a document asking potential providers to submit bids to operate the program. The request for proposals that bidders will be responding to has been posted in the city register, giving a sense of the scale of […]