Rally Against Demolition for Enormous ‘Temporary’ Parking Lots

Forest City Ratner plans to demolish two entire city blocks – including historic buildings that should be reused like the Ward Bakery – to create enormous “temporary” surface parking lots for over 1400 cars that would blight Brooklyn for decades.

These parking lots will also encourage more people to drive, leading to worse traffic, worse air quality, and worse quality of life for those living in the surrounding neighborhoods. And they simply aren’t needed. No other large-scale development in the city has required the demolition of two city blocks for parking.

We need to send Eliot Spitzer and Mike Bloomberg a simple message: New Yorkers deserve better. Please join BrooklynSpeaks.net to rally against demolition for parking. There will be passionate speeches and great music – the Lafayette Inspirational Gospel Choir and singer Dave Hall will be performing.

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