Rumor Mill: Agencies Will Have to Budget for Parking Permits

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Word has it that as city agenices flesh out their budgets for next year, Mayor Bloomberg is considering requiring that they include the cost of employee parking permits as a specific budget line item. In other words, if the NYPD or any other agency wants to give out untold hundreds of parking permits to its employees, that is going to cost something and be accounted for. This won’t necessarily convince the unions to stop printing bogus parking permits for their members and it won’t get the cops to start towing the illegally parked cars of their colleagues but, hey, it’s a start.

Transportation researcher Bruce Schaller estimates that the curbside parking spaces consumed by government employees would be worth $46 million per year in parking meter revenue. If government employees drove to work at the same rate as their private sector counterparts, 19,200 fewer cars would enter Manhattan each day.

  • P

    Wow- great work by TA- and yourselves.

  • A nice step in the right direction.

    Instead of billing the agencies, they should bill the employees. While a placard may seem invaluable, just charging $50 / month might get rid of quite a bit of people that don’t need it.

    More long term, they need to create more incentives for these employees to live in dense, mass transit oriented areas and not in the ‘burbs.

  • Is it “untold” or “un-tolled?”

  • Nicolo Macchiavelli

    Many of these permits have been given out on a “lifetime” basis. Getting rid of them now would be a heavy lift. Cutting off future passes would be much easier.

  • JK

    Government parking permits for personal vehicles can and should be eliminated. Government employees can be given tax free parking benefits, similar to transitchek. When it comes to parking privileges, the municipal culture of entitlement and veniality is so deepset that anything short of a totally new approach will fail.

  • I don’t understand this story. What effect does requiring a budget line have? Who will be giving money to whom and how will it prevent parking abuse?

    I mean, isn’t the whole problem with the parking that it’s free (and thus overused)? So how does a budget line that reads “zero” have any effect on anyone?

  • The way I heard it, a value will be assigned to parking permits. Say, a parking permit is worth $2,500 per year. If a city agency wants one hundred parking permits then it will have to subtract $250,000 from its budget that could be used for other purposes. I’m not sure where that money actually goes, however. And this is all a rumor, remember. It may not even be happening.

  • I see! Thanks!

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