Sidewalk Security on Madison Avenue

In his spare time, StreetsBlog’s new contributor, Jeff Zupan from the Regional Plan Association is roaming Manhattan snapping photos of security barricades and their impact on the city’s street life. It’s a big honor to have Jeff publishing here.

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Concrete barricades protecting a concrete barricade. Madison Avenue in the upper 40’s. (Photo: Jeff Zupan)

  • Nice shot – I work near there. Lexington near Grand Central is also a pain in the butt like that.

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